CORAL

This photographic exhibition takes you into the fragile world of coral reefs, highlighting the harmony between humans and nature: a message that is both urgent and full of hope.

 

© 2020. Martin Colognoli

CORAL

The CORAL exhibition takes you into the fragile world of coral reefs, highlighting the harmony between humans and nature: a message that is both urgent and full of hope.

Discover the remarkable story of traditional Indonesian fishermen protecting and restoring the destroyed ecosystem on which they directly depend for their livelihood: THE CORAL REEF.

Coral reefs are a refuge, a home, and a food resource for 25% of the world’s marine biodiversity. They also serve as coastal protection and as a food and economic resource for 275 million people.

Coral Guardian is a French NGO, founded in 2012, that addresses the issue of the degradation of coral reefs on which humans depend, through participative marine conservation and awareness programs.

The damages caused by dynamite and cyanide fishing techniques are still ongoing. It is important to act quickly in order to raise awareness among coastal communities on the importance of coral reefs. Coral Guardian is working with the fishing village of Seraya, whose inhabitants, in turn, raise awareness among tourists and locals on the importance of coral ecosystems.

It is often difficult to raise awareness about a cause that seems far away from our daily lives. This exhibition brings you into a world of damaged reefs, committed fishermen and restored reefs… A message that is both urgent and full of hope.

TESTIMONY

« Throughout scenes taken on the spot, this photo documentary first tells the story of a human adventure with people I admire and for whom I have the greatest respect.

It takes place in the fishing village of Seraya Besar, a small remote island located off the west coast of Flores, near Komodo National Park in Indonesia. Located in the centre of the coral triangle, the epicentre of marine biodiversity, this area is home to 76% of the world’s coral species and 2,228 species of reef fish.

Its inhabitants come from nomadic seafaring populations. Hunted by Japanese troops, they settled at the end of the Second World War. This village of 750 inhabitants depends solely on fishing; their food sovereignty is essential to their survival. Being a fisherman is considered to be one of the most dangerous jobs in the world.

I have known the people of this village for 7 years now. I go there every year for several months in a row, to carry on implementing a program of marine conservation and protection of coral reefs. Having taken the time to know them, I have been able to enter their daily life and participate in ancestral activities, such as fishing.

I feel particularly grateful to them for the immense wealth of knowledge they have shared with me. To have allowed me to enter their lives, to have granted me their friendship and to have communicated their ‘joie de vivre’ is the most precious human adventure. »

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